The Show (is scheduled to) go on!

Oxford was hit yesterday with -- what to us looked like -- a blizzard! Filmmakers arriving on Wednesday night had to spend the night at the airport hotel, and all schools/offices in town are closed again today. HOWEVER: we are holding out hope that we can continue with our plans tonight at the Malco Oxford Commons, and for the weekend. We are picking up filmmakers as they arrive in Memphis, and will open the will call table at 5:30 as planned. 

Something about the Film Festival weekend brings out the worse in Mother Nature...it seems like just yesterday that we were having to ask Mayor Patterson to call in the fire department to clear the sidewalk in front of the Lyric so nobody would slip... 

Be careful out there -- see you this weekend!

During OFF 2015: Faulkner films at Public Library

The Lafayette County and Oxford Public Library in conjunction with the 12th annual Oxford Film Festival will be screening Faulkner Films -- all screenings are FREE and open to the public.

Friday, February 27

longhotsummerposter
  • 12:00 p.m. The Long Hot Summer
  • 2:00 p.m. Tomorrow

Saturday, February 28

  • 10:00 a.m. Two Soldiers
  • 12:00 p.m. Barn Burning
  • 1:00 p.m. The Reivers
  • 3:00 p.m. As I Lay Dying

For more information, contact the Lafayette County and Oxford Public Library: 662-234-5751


Oxford Film Festival prepares for 12th year, and final for 4 volunteer directors

January 29,  2015

Oxford, Mississippi – As the 12th annual Oxford Film Festival nears, the directors are preparing for their final year with the festival as a volunteer-run event. The directors are in talks with several groups on the best direction forward.

“While we celebrate this year’s lineup, we are also saying a bittersweet goodbye,” Executive Director Molly Fergusson said. “This year’s Oxford Film Festival will be the last of its kind: organized and run entirely by unpaid volunteers. This is happy news; the
festival has grown beyond what four, year-round volunteers, can manage. In walking away, we leave the film landscape in Oxford very different from how we found it.”

When OFF first appeared at the Ford Center in June 2003, the independent Hoka Theater had been closed for seven years. There was only one four-screen movie theater in town. Netflix was just getting started. iTunes had opened, but was not yet selling video content. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Vimeo did not exist yet. The state of
Mississippi had two film festivals: one in Jackson and one in Starkville, and the number of filmmakers in Oxford could be counted on one hand.

The Oxford Film Festival has filled a void that no longer exists for fans of independent film in North Mississippi. The University of Mississippi and the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council have expanded their offerings in recent years for both filmmakers and film lovers, from OxFilm to the Cinema Minor and the graduate documentary track in
Southern Studies with high-profile guest speakers in between. Independent films are now shown year round in a variety of forms both with the local theater and public library, arts council and university, and filmmakers who were introduced to the area through the film festival have come back to film here.

“The directors’ years of hard work have created an Oxford treasure that both brings attention to our artists locally and on a national scale,” Yoknapatawpha Arts Council Director, Wayne Andrews, said. “The festival is a highlight for Oxford and amongst film fans as the festival has a reputation for creative programs, exciting films and the warmth of the Oxford community.  They pass on to Oxford a gift of a well-run festival by creating an endowment to enable it to continue and grow.”

The Yoknapatawpha Arts Council originally founded the festival in 2003. In 2008 the festival became its own 501c3 run by volunteers. Molly Fergusson was named executive director at that time having served in several capacities since the first festival in 2003.

Michelle Emanuel, Diala Chaney and Melanie Addington have also served as co-directors since that time. Former long-time director Micah Ginn retired from the festival two years ago. Other directors served for shorter terms in the beginning of the festival as well. Since 2003, all of OFF’s directors have been unpaid volunteers.

“We have no doubt that independent cinema will continue in some form or fashion in Oxford with or without us,” Fergusson said. “We are proud of the work we have done in the last 12 years and grateful for the support of our sponsors and the Oxford community as well as the support of our patient and understanding families, but we realize that it is time for us to move on.  As the festival has grown, so have we,
and we are looking forward to new challenges and adventures in our
personal and professional lives.”

An endowment has been set up for the festival with the Create Foundation to help ensure it continues to grow in the coming years and donations are being accepted.

To learn more about this year’s line-up, visit www.oxfordfilmfest.com.
To donate to the Oxford Film Festival Endowment, visit
http://www.createfoundation.com or donate directly at the information
desk at the this year’s festival February 26-March 1.

Get the schedule on your home screen!

This year's festival schedule has been posted online via Sched.org -- you can bookmark it with your phone or tablet, but it's even easier if you add the icon to your home screen. 

Using your mobile device, go to the online festival schedule, and follow the steps to save to your home screen. For Apple devices such as iPhone and iPad, press the box-with-arrow above the home button, then choose "add to Home Screen". 

Create a profile and save your personal schedule! 

We're going to press this week on the printed guide, but in the meantime, start making a list of what you plan to see!